Trident Coconut Milk – Ingredients & Processing – Pantry Audit

 

Trident Coconut Milk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ingredients:

Trident Coconut Milk  ING

Coconut Milk (52%)

Coconut milk is the liquid that comes from the grated meat of a coconut. The colour and rich taste of the milk can be attributed to the high oil content. Most of the fat is saturated fat – the good kind

Several grades of coconut milk exist: from thick at 20-22% fat to thin at 5-7% fat level. Thick milk can be prepared by directly squeezing grated coconut meat through cheesecloth. The squeezed coconut meat is then soaked in warm water and squeezed a second or third time for thin coconut milk.

 Water

Speaks for itself but no indicator as to whether filtered or not

Stabiliser 466

Carboxymethylcellulose is prepared from cellulose, the main polysaccharide and constituent of wood and all plant structures. Commercially prepared from wood and chemically modified. No known adverse effects but it could be produced from genetically engineered cotton plants. Known to cause cancer when ingested by test animals. Many different uses, mainly as thickening agent, but also as filler, dietary fibre, anti clumping agent and emulsifier. Similar as cellulose, but very soluble in water. Found in many different products. Carboxymethyl cellulose is very soluble, and can be fermented in the large intestine. Large concentrations can cause intestinal problems, such as bloating, constipation and diarrhoea. It also lowers slightly the blood cholesterol level. 

Can be found on lists of “food additives to be avoided” but no explanations as to why eg

http://nutritionclinic.wordpress.com/2009/04/29/food-additives-50-food-additives-should-be-avoided/

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Processing:

Query has been sent to Trident. Will keep you updated on response

General info:

Coconut milk can be made at home by processing grated coconut with hot water or milk, which extracts the oil and aromatic compounds. It has then a fat content of 17-24% depending on the fat level of the coconut meat and the quantity of added water. When refrigerated and left to set, coconut cream will rise to the top and separate out from the milk. To avoid this in commercial sold coconut milk, an emulsifier(s) and a stabiliser(s) have to be used.

Manufacturers of canned coconut milk typically combine thin and thick milk, with the addition of water as a filler. An official world standard can be found at Codex Alimentarius, STAN 240-2003.

Shaking the can prior to opening will even it out to a creamy thickness. Some brands sold in Western countries add thickening agents and/or emulsifiers to prevent the milk from separating inside the can, since the separation tends to be misinterpreted as an indicator of spoilage by people unfamiliar with coconut milk.

Once opened, cans of coconut milk must be refrigerated and are usually only good for a few days. If not, the milk can sour and spoil easily.

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Coconut Milk in cans:

BPA is used in the lining of certain canned foods. BPA especially leaches into canned foods that are acidic, salty or fatty, such as coconut milk, tomatoes, soup, and vegetables. Something to note in light of a recent study which found an association between neurobehavioral problems in infants and high levels of BPA in their mothers.

If you want to be on the safe side and reduce your exposure to BPA, you have to reduce your consumption of canned foods as much as possible.

Coconut milk can also be made quite easily at home, with coconut flakes, a blender and cheesecloth. Here’s a video to show you how

Sources:

http://www.mbm.net.au/health/400-495.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coconut_milk

http://chriskresser.com/3-reasons-why-coconut-milk-may-not-be-your-friend

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